McCarthy questions Biden's change of mind on coronavirus travel bans, new restrictions announced


House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy’s office is questioning if President Biden changed his mind when it comes to coronavirus-related travel bans after it was reported that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is imposing a new restriction on travelers from South Africa.

A spokesperson for the California Republican pointed to when Biden urged then-President Trump in a tweet to “[s]top the xenophobic fear-mongering” after he announced a ban on travel from China.

BIDEN TO REINSTATE COVID-19 TRAVEL BAN FOR MOST NON-US CITIZENS, SOURCES SAY

“Has President Biden changed his mind on the efficacy of coronavirus entry bans?” McCarthy’s office asked. “Or are entry bans still ‘xenophobic fear-mongering’? Which is it? The American people deserve to know.”

When asked by Fox News’ Peter Doocy about the new restrictions in light of Biden’s past comment, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said she did not believe this was “a fair articulation.”

“The president has been clear that he felt the Muslim ban was xenophobic,” Psaki said, noting that Biden rescinded the ban on travel from certain Muslim-majority countries. Psaki also claimed that Biden and his team supported travel restrictions before he took office.

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“But he was critical of the former president for having a policy that was not more comprehensive than travel restrictions,” she added.

In a tweet posted the day after the ban on travelers who had been to China was announced, Biden said, “We are in the midst of a crisis with the coronavirus. We need to lead the way with science — not Donald Trump’s record of hysteria, xenophobia, and fear-mongering.”

The questioning of Biden’s current stance on pandemic-related travel restrictions followed a Reuters report on the CDC’s new protective measure.

“We are adding South Africa to the restricted list because of the concerning variant present that has already spread beyond South Africa,” CDC principal deputy director Dr. Anne Schuchat told the outlet.

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The restriction on South Africa is in addition to the ban on entry to the U.S. on most non-U.S. citizens who have recently been to more than two dozen other countries, including Brazil, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and 26 countries on the European continent that allow travel across open borders, White House sources confirmed to Fox News.

The restrictions on Europe and Brazil were initially imposed by Trump. Two days before leaving office, Trump had ordered them to be lifted as of this Tuesday. Instead of allowing the bans to expire, Biden reinstituted them.

Fox News’ Bradford Betz contributed to this report.



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US coronavirus cases, hospitalizations hit ‘natural plateau,’ not vaccine driven: experts


Infectious disease experts are noting a plateau in U.S. coronavirus cases and hospitalizations — though it is far too soon to tie the positive news to ongoing vaccinations

Instead, experts attribute the decline to the post-holiday season, as less people travel and gather in indoor settings.

“After a long winter surge, the country is beginning to experience a declining number of new COVID-19 infections,” Dr. Steven Gordon, chair of infectious disease at Cleveland Clinic, wrote in an email. “While vaccinations will play an important role in controlling the pandemic, this slowing of cases is probably not yet a result of vaccinations. More likely, the plateau is occurring as less people are traveling and getting together as we move past the holiday season.”

Data from Johns Hopkins University report a steady drop in daily cases since early January, declining from nearly 250,000 new infections to about 170,000 in recent days, per 7-day averages. The nationwide positivity rate, or percentage of tests coming back positive, has dropped from over 13% to 9.4% in January. Hospitalizations are also falling; from about 130,000 in hospital care around Jan. 10 to 118,000 more recently, per 7-day averages from The COVID Tracking Project.

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, President Biden’s chief medical adviser on COVID-19, told NBC News on Monday that the figures represent a natural peak and plateau.

“The number of vaccines that we’ve gotten into the arms of people, good start we want to keep going, get a lot of people vaccinated, but I don’t think the dynamics of what we’re seeing now with the plateauing is significantly influenced yet, it will be soon, but yet by the vaccine,” he said. “I just think it’s the natural course of plateauing.”

As vaccinations reach further into the population, experts expect a significant drop in hospitalizations, especially among the elderly and those with underlying conditions at higher risk for severe COVID-19, says Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, professor at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

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There have been at least 21.8 million COVID-19 vaccinations so far in the U.S., or about 6% of the country’s population, per figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We are nowhere near the approximately 75% of the population which needs to be immune before the outbreak dies out from “herd immunity,” Dr. Dean Winslow, infectious disease physician at Stanford Health Care, wrote in an email. “It is so important for Americans to continue to follow these physical preventive measures until we get to that 75% point.”

Dr. Gordon with the Cleveland Clinic noted that the current pace of vaccinations and level of virus spread will likely require mitigation measures like mask wearing and social distancing through the summer to prevent further virus spread as the country moves to herd immunity.



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JR Smith posts Kobe Bryant tribute as death anniversary nears: 'Took these days for granted'


J.R. Smith is still trying to comprehend the loss of Kobe Bryant nearly a year after the Los Angeles Lakers legend died in a helicopter crash in California.

Smith posted a touching tribute to Bryant two days before the 1-year anniversary of his death on his Instagram page. The picture showed Smith, while with the Denver Nuggets, guarding Bryant.

“Took these days for granted. Thought i was really going to play against you forever. Appreciate the competitive nature you brought out in me, s—t can’t lie i ain’t know i had some of this s—t till you had out them a-s whoopings an i had to figure it out. The game misses your avatar but we all know your soul is all around it. Miss you,” Smith wrote.

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Tributes to Bryant and his late daughter Gigi are expected to pour in over the course of the week as the NBA, fans, professional athletes and others will remember their lives.

Bryant, 41, was one of the most recognized athletes across the world. He was selected in the first round of the 1996 NBA Draft by the Charlotte Hornets out of Lower Merion High School in Pennsylvania.

He subsequently was traded to the Lakers for Vlade Divac before the start of the 1996-97 season. It proved to be one of the most important trades in NBA history.

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Bryant would help lead the Lakers to five NBA championships and was a part of one of the best NBA dynasties alongside Shaquille O’Neal. Bryant and O’Neal won three straight NBA titles from 1999 to 2002. He then won two rings with Pau Gasol in 2009 and 2010.

“The Black Mamba” wrapped up his playing career in 2016. He played his final game against the Utah Jazz and finished with an epic performance – 60 points, four rebounds and four assists.

Bryant was on a helicopter flying over Calabasas – a city of 23,000 people located about 30 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles – when it crashed in foggy weather Jan. 26, 2020.

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Officials said all those on board died.



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Chief Justice John Roberts not expected to preside over Trump impeachment trial, Patrick Leahy likely will


Vermont Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy “is expected to preside” over the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, a Senate source told Fox News, signaling that Chief Justice John Roberts will not be forced to oversee the politically charged arguments now that Trump is out of office.

The source said Leahy, the president pro tempore of the Senate, would preside instead of the chief justice because senators usually fill that role when the impeached individual is not the current president of the United States.

Politico last week reported that Roberts “wants no further part” in overseeing an impeachment after he presided over Trump’s impeachment trial one year ago.

During that trial, Democrats pressured Roberts to get involved against the former president, including an instance in which Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., asked Roberts whether he was harming the Supreme Court’s legitimacy because Republicans wouldn’t allow witnesses. And Trump himself habitually attacked Roberts on Twitter while he was in office. 

Chief Justice John Roberts smiles for the cameras as the nine members of the Supreme Court pose for a new group photograph on October, 08, 2010 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Chief Justice John Roberts smiles for the cameras as the nine members of the Supreme Court pose for a new group photograph on October, 08, 2010 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Roberts is known for his desire to preserve the institutional integrity of the Supreme Court as a neutral arbiter that calls “balls and strikes.” He often will lead coalitions on the court to rule narrowly on hot-button issues, deciding merely the case in front of the justices without announcing broader proclamations that some of his fellow justices would like. 

TRUMP IMPEACHMENT ARTICLE BEING SENT TO SENATE MONDAY

The chief justice of the United States is constitutionally required to oversee impeachment trials of sitting presidents. But it’s not clear whether the chief justice is required to oversee a trial of a former president. That Roberts will not oversee the upcoming trial is evidence that he and top Senate leaders do not believe he must be there for the body to hold a legitimate trial of a former president. 

The news that Leahy, D-Vt., will preside over the trial of Trump also means that Vice President Kamala Harris will also not. CNN first reported that Leahy will preside. Harris has a constitutional role as the president of the Senate and is expected to be highly involved in the upcoming Congress in order to break ties on votes that fall along party lines — the Senate is currently split evenly with 50 Republicans, 48 Democrats and two independents who caucus with Democrats.

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 22: U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) speaks as Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) listens during a news conference in front of the U.S. Capitol after a boycott of the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court on October 22, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to advance, without the presence of Democratic members, the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 22: U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) speaks as Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) listens during a news conference in front of the U.S. Capitol after a boycott of the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court on October 22, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to advance, without the presence of Democratic members, the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In almost all cases, the vice president and the Senate president pro tempore are interchangeable as far as who oversees Senate business. The job of Senate president pro tempore goes to the most senior member of the majority party — Leahy has been in office for more than 46 years. 

The person who presides over the Senate trial of Trump is unlikely to have a substantive effect on the proceedings but will affect the optics of the event.

House impeachment managers will deliver the impeachment articles to the Senate at 7 p.m. Monday night, officially triggering the start of the trial. But a deal reached between Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., will allow both the impeachment managers and Trump’s legal team the opportunity to submit what are essentially pre-trial briefs over a period of a couple of weeks. 

The meat and potatoes of the trial, when Leahy will be presiding over arguments on the floor from both sides, will not start until Feb. 9. 

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and his wife Marcelle, arrive for the 59th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and his wife Marcelle, arrive for the 59th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021.
((AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, Pool))

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The House impeached Trump this month after a mob of his supporters stormed the Capitol while lawmakers and former Vice President Mike Pence were meeting in a joint session to certify President Biden’s electoral victory on Jan. 6. 

Trump held a rally earlier that day at which he doubled-down on months of false claims that he won the presidential election and encouraged rallygoers to march to the Capitol “peacefully and patriotically.” At the same rally, his most vocal supporters used harsh rhetoric, including lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who said “let’s have trial by combat.”

It’s highly unlikely that Trump could be convicted at a Senate trial, as 17 Republicans would need to join all 50 Democrats to reach the two-thirds threshold. But if Trump is convicted, he could be barred from holding office in the future by a simple majority on a subsequent vote. 

Fox News’ Jason Donner contributed to this report.



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Tacoma, Portland see weekend of violent Antifa, anti-ICE unrest


Demonstrations persisted over the weekend in Portland and Tacoma, Wash., where anti-police crowds displayed Antifa messages and decried Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) even after President Biden offered a sweeping immigration overhaul last week. 

In Tacoma, located 30 miles south of Seattle, at least 150 people gathered at a park before marching through downtown where windows were shattered and spray paint was tagged on multiple buildings. Several items were set up to create a barricade in the street where a large trash can was set ablaze.

Protesters wore black bloc attire and some carried flags that read “Antifascist Action.” The crowd also passed by the Pierce County Jail.

While officers were observing the protest, three people appeared to try to get onto the roof of a building downtown. Two were armed with a handgun and knives and were arrested, police said. The third got away.

LEFT-WING RIOTS RATTLE US CITIES EVEN AFTER PRESIDENT BIDEN’S INAUGURATION

Trash burns as people take part in a protest against police brutality, late Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021, in downtown Tacoma, Wash., south of Seattle. The protest came a day after at least two people were injured when a Tacoma Police officer responding to a report of a street race drove his car through a crowd of pedestrians that had gathered around him. Several people were knocked to the ground and at least one person was run over. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Trash burns as people take part in a protest against police brutality, late Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021, in downtown Tacoma, Wash., south of Seattle. The protest came a day after at least two people were injured when a Tacoma Police officer responding to a report of a street race drove his car through a crowd of pedestrians that had gathered around him. Several people were knocked to the ground and at least one person was run over. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

There were no known injuries from the demonstration, the Tacoma Police Department tweeted, adding that the demonstration had broken up and the roadways were cleared by 11 p.m. local time.

The protesters came a day after a video widely circulated online showed a Tacoma police car drive into a crowd gathering in an intersection on Saturday, appearing to run over at least one person.  

Two people were injured and went to the hospital with injuries not believed to be life-threatening.

Protesters chase a street preacher, right, who was using a loudspeaker to deliver a sermon during a protest against police brutality, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021, in downtown Tacoma, Wash. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Protesters chase a street preacher, right, who was using a loudspeaker to deliver a sermon during a protest against police brutality, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021, in downtown Tacoma, Wash. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

The officer driving has been placed on administrative leave, and the Tacoma Community’s Police Advisory Committee scheduled a virtual meeting Monday at 6 p.m. to discuss the incident.

The officer, identified as a 58-year-old man who has been with the department for 29 and a half years, had been surrounded by a crowd after responding to a report about a street race, where about 100 people were blocking an intersection Saturday night, KING-TV, the NBC affiliated station in Seattle, reported.

Police said people began hitting the body of the cruiser, and the officer feared for his safety. The officer drove forward through the crowd, and then stopped and called for medical aid, the department said.

In Portland, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facility in Portland, Ore., was once again the target of protesters on Saturday night. Video circulated on social media showed the crowd at one point chanting, “No borders! No nations! Abolish deportations!”

Law enforcement officers from the Federal Protective Service were heard declaring an “unlawful assembly” around 10 p.m. local time and ordering the crowd to leave the area. The FPS is a unit of the Department of Homeland Security.

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A recording played that warned that anyone who trespasses on federal property with a weapon will be arrested. Federal law enforcement also deployed tear gas to disperse the crowd.

The same ICE building was targeted last Wednesday, hours after the presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C. That night, some members of a crowd of about 150 rioters in Portland caused damage to the ICE building and also marched against the state headquarters of the Democratic Party.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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Former Oregon substitute teacher indicted in connection with summer Portland riot, officials say


A former substitute teacher and school volleyball coach has been indicted for allegedly damaging a Portland Police vehicle during a riot in August, officials recently announced.

Malia Lynne Trammel, 29, was arraigned on Jan. 20 on charges of riot, criminal mischief, escape, interfering with a peace officer and identity theft, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office said. The office did not release additional information regarding the charges.

A spokesperson for the Gladstone School District in Gladstone, Ore. confirmed in an email to Fox News on Monday that Trammell worked as “an occasional substitute teacher and a part time assistant volleyball coach,” but has not done so since November 2019. Internet records posted online indicate she was a “Long Term Substitute Science Teacher” for Gladstone High School.

LEFT-WING RIOTS RATTLE US CITIES EVEN AFTER PRESIDENT BIDEN’S INAUGURATION

Malia L Trammell (Multnomah County Sheriff's Office)

Malia L Trammell (Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office)
((Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office))

A phone number listed for Trammell was not accepting calls on Monday.

LATEST PORTLAND ANTI-ICE PROTEST PROMPTS FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT RESPONSE

According to a Jan. 20 press release, Trammell punctured one of the tires on a Portland Police Bureau (PPB) “sound truck” on Aug. 6 2020, while the vehicle was deployed on East Burnside Street during unrest. Police use the truck to make announcements and “external and amplified verbal orders,” the release states.

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Law enforcement first submitted the case to the D.A.’s office on Aug. 7, but the case was initially closed. PPB then re-submitted the case. A grand jury returned an indictment on Jan. 8, at which point Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt reinstated the case.

Trammell was arraigned on Jan. 20. A record search indicates she is not currently in custody.



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White House condemns riots in Portland, Seattle: 'Smashing windows is not protesting and neither is looting’


White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Monday said President Biden condemned violence in Portland and Seattle, saying he supports “peaceful protests,” but that “smashing windows is not protesting and neither is looting,” calling that activity “completely unacceptable.” 

Psaki was asked during the White House press briefing Monday for Biden’s reaction to recent unrest in the Pacific Northwest.

LATEST PORTLAND ANTI-ICE PROTEST PROMPTS FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT RESPONSE

“President Biden condemns violence and any violence in the strongest possible terms,” Psaki said. “Peaceful protests are a cornerstone of our democracy but smashing windows is not protesting and neither is looting, and actions like these are totally unacceptable.”

More than a dozen people were arrested in the two cities, according to police reports, after demonstrators angry with Biden targeted government buildings and the Oregon Democratic Party building in Portland.

In Portland, about 150 people marched on the headquarters of the Democratic Party of Oregon and a federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building.

A group of protesters demonstrate Wednesday evening, Jan. 20, 2021, outside the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building in Portland, Ore. (Assfault Pirates via AP)

A group of protesters demonstrate Wednesday evening, Jan. 20, 2021, outside the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building in Portland, Ore. (Assfault Pirates via AP)

The demonstrators, most clad in black, spray-painted anarchy symbols on buildings, broke windows and marched under a banner that read, “We are ungovernable.”

“We don’t want Biden — we want revenge for police murders, imperialist wars, and fascist massacres,” read another banner that the group marched under. 

In Seattle, hours after Biden took office last week, a group of about 100 people marched in the Emerald City, where police said windows were broken at a federal courthouse and officers arrested three people.

Federal law enforcement responded to the unrest over the weekend.

Meanwhile, shifting to the coronavirus pandemic, Psaki announced that President Biden has decided to maintain travel restrictions for the Schengen Area, Northern Ireland and Brazil, and added South Africa to the restriction list.

Psaki said that the Biden administration was tightening up requirements to fly into the U.S. and said any travelers must have proof of negative COVID-19 tests within three days of departing for the U.S.

PORTLAND RIOTERS DAMAGE ICE BUILDING; POLICE DECLARE ‘UNLAWFUL ASSEMBLY’

Psaki was asked about Biden’s comments on the campaign trail in March 2020, calling former President Trump’s move to ban travel from China into the U.S. at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic “xenophobic,” and how his travel ban would be described.

“I don’t think that is quite a fair articulation. He was clear the Muslim Ban was xenophobic,” Psaki said, pointing to Biden’s move last week to overturn the Trump-era travel ban on mostly Muslim countries. “He supported travel restrictions to ensure the American people are safe.”

She added: “He was critical of the former president for having a policy that was not more comprehensive than just travel restrictions.”

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Psaki went on to say that Biden has a “multi-faceted approach,” including vaccinations, and wearing masks for at least the first 100 days of his presidency.

Psaki also announced Monday that coronavirus public health briefings will return three times a week, and will be presented by Biden administration COVID-19 officials and scientists.



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Cactus League asks MLB to delay spring training due to COVID


The Cactus League and Arizona community leaders have asked Major League Baseball to delay the start of spring training due to coronavirus concerns just over three weeks before pitchers and catchers are supposed to report.

The Cactus League made the request in a letter to Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred obtained by The Associated Press on Monday. The letter was co-signed by the mayors of Mesa, Scottsdale, Surprise, Glendale, Goodyear and Peoria, as well as representatives from Phoenix and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

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MLB said in a statement that it “will continue to consult with public health authorities, medical experts, and the Players Association whether any schedule modifications to the announced start of Spring Training and the Championship Season should be made in light of the current COVID-19 environment to ensure the safety of the players, coaches, umpires, MLB employees and other game day personnel in a sport that plays every day.”

Arizona is averaging just over 7,000 new coronavirus cases per day, but the Cactus League cited data in its letter from the University of Washington’s Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation projecting a sharp decline in infections by mid-March, down to as few as 3,072 daily. Spring camps are set to open the week of Feb. 15, with the regular season set to start on April 1.

Despite the roiling case numbers, the NHL’s Arizona Coyotes are hosting 3,450 fans for home games in Glendale, while the NBA’s Phoenix Suns are playing without fans. High school sports are also still operating. The Cactus League hosts 15 MLB clubs.

Any changes to the major league schedule are subject to agreement with the players’ association per terms of their collective bargaining agreement. A person familiar with talks between the sides said MLB asked the union in November about moving back opening day a month to create a safer playing environment, possibly spurred by the availability of the vaccine.

The union asked if the postseason could be moved back to make up the 30 or so missed games, or if the league would pay players for the missed games if they weren’t made up. The league declined, saying it wouldn’t push the postseason deep into November over broadcast concerns and wouldn’t pay players for missed games.

Talks stalled there, and no formal proposals about altering opening day have been exchanged.

The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity Monday because the discussions were considered private.

While the league was able to impose a shortened 60-game regular season in 2020 per the terms of an agreement with the union signed in March, it doesn’t have the authority to unilaterally adjust the 2021 season under the current collective bargaining agreement.

The person also confirmed that the union turned down a December offer from the league that included a permanent adoption of an expanded postseason and the universal designated hitter — changes instituted temporarily in 2020.

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In the negotiations — first reported by The Athletic on Monday — the league also asked for a variety of on-field changes, including use of a pitch clock and an automated strike zone in spring training. In exchanged, it offered to resolve two service-time grievances from last season in the union’s favor and boost the players’ guaranteed postseason share from $50 million last season to more than $80 million, roughly what the players got in 2019.

The union declined the proposal because it is opposed to expanding the postseason, fearing it will disincentive teams from pursuing free agents.



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Floyd Mayweather Jr. mocks Conor McGregor as 'Con Artist McLoser' after UFC 257


Floyd Mayweather Jr. has seen enough of Conor McGregor.

Mayweather added insult to injury after McGregor’s technical knockout loss to Dustin Poirier at UFC 257 on Saturday night. The superstar boxer, who defeated McGregor in their own spectacle a few years ago, lashed out against the Irishman on Instagram in the moments after his loss.

“I seen this post and my take on it is that the world knows Con Artist McLoser can steal everything from me and be loved but I’m hated. That just lets you all know that racism still exist. Just know, that bum will never be me or be on my level,” Mayweather wrote.

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“I’m just built different, my mindset is on another planet, my skills are second to none, I’m a natural born winner and yes I talk a lot of trash, but every time I back it up! This is what they hate. It’s sad that you can be a poor black kid from the ghetto that has dealt with racism your whole life and work extremely hard to put yourself and your family in a better position, and most of the hate come from my own people. Connor cannot even win in his own sport, but talking about coming back to boxing to fight (Manny) Pacquiao. Nobody wants to see that, it’s like my leftovers eating leftovers.”

McGregor, 32, admitted right after the fight that the loss was a “tough one to swallow.” He would elaborate on his comments in the post-fight press conference.

“It’s hard to take,” McGregor said, via AFP. “(It’s) the highest highs and the lowest lows in this game. I don’t know where I’m at, at the minute, to be honest.

JAKE PAUL MOCKS CONOR MCGREGOR, LOWERS FIGHT OFFER AFTER UFC 257

“I have no excuse. It was a phenomenal performance from Dustin. It’s a bitter pill to swallow.”

McGregor was spotted by reporters coming out of the locker room with a crutch after Poirier appeared to do some serious damage to his leg. The former champion would post a photo on his Instagram of himself relaxing in Abu Dhabi with his leg elevated to try and relieve some of the pain.

“Thanks for the support everyone! Was not my night/morning in there but a great contest to improve on. I’m excited at the blockbuster trilogy I now have on my hands. Dustin is a hell of a competitor and I look forward to going again. Elevating the leg and the spirit on my way home! God bless us all, happy Sunday,” he captioned the photo.

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It’s unclear what’s next for McGregor. He said after the loss he plans on fighting again this year.



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Thomas keeps Citi sponsorship with money donated to LGBTQ


Investment bank Citi decided Monday to keep its sponsorship of Justin Thomas, condemning the anti-gay slur he muttered and requiring him to donate a “meaningful portion” of his deal as part of an active role in LGBTQ causes.

Carla Hassan, the chief marketing officer of New York-based Citi, announced the decision in a company blog post titled, “When an apology isn’t enough.”

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“We considered terminating our relationship with him,” she wrote. “It would send a clear and important message, but we decided to use this moment to work with Justin to try to create change.”

Thomas, the No. 3 player in the world whose 13 victories at age 27 include a major championship, missed a 4-foot par putt in the Sentry Tournament of Champions at Kapalua on Jan. 9 when television audio caught him muttering the slur under his breath. Thomas apologized after the third and final rounds.

Ralph Lauren Corp. ended its sponsorship of him a week later.

Hassan said some of her colleagues felt anything less than cutting ties to Thomas would undermine Citi’s commitment to the LGBTQ community and that was considered.

“We want to more than make it clear that it is wrong to use this word,” she wrote. “Instead, we hope our efforts can lead more people to make an affirmative choice not to use this word or others like it — and speak up when others do — because they understand the impact it can have, including on a friend, colleague or teammates who may be struggling with the decision to disclose their sexual orientation.”

She said Citi would work with Thomas to help accelerate support for the LGBTQ community and to increase awareness. Terms of his endorsement deal with Citi were not disclosed, nor did the company say how much money would be donated to various organizations as a “meaningful portion” of his sponsorship fee.

“If at any point we feel Justin is not sincere in working toward this goal, we will end our relationship with him,” she wrote.

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Thomas has emerged as one of the best players in the world without any behavior criticism since earning his PGA Tour card one year after leaving college at Alabama. He won the PGA Championship in 2017 at Quail Hollow, has two World Golf Championships titles, and twice has risen to No. 1 in the world.

He missed the cut last week in the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship with a double bogey on the final hole. Thomas is not playing this week in San Diego. He typically plays the Waste Management Phoenix Open, which will be played next week with an estimated 5,000 spectators per day — a small fraction of the usual attendance at golf’s rowdiest tournament.



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